The Story of Things
Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the modern ‘epidemic’ of Loneliness

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the modern ‘epidemic’ of Loneliness

January 9, 2020

In countries such as the UK, the United States and Japan more people than ever are describing themselves as lonely. In this episode of The Story of Things, Dr Fay Bound Alberti, from the Department of History at the University of York, explores why we can only begin to address the modern ‘epidemic’ of loneliness by exploring its history and emergence as a modern emotion.

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at health and inequality

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at health and inequality

January 9, 2020

How does inequality affect people’s health in modern Britain? Professor Kate Pickett from the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York discusses the impact of wealth and social status on people’s health and her work on the unique research project Born in Bradford, which aims to transform the health and wellbeing of children in the city.

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the North-South divide

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the North-South divide

January 9, 2020

Is England really a country divided into grim north and beautiful south? In this podcast episode, Professor Tim Doran, from the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York, explores the truth behind this enduring myth and discusses how his research aims to give policy makers the information they need to tackle inequality effectively.

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the evolution of compassion

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the evolution of compassion

January 9, 2020

Could a greater understanding of human origins help to improve the health and wellbeing of adolescents? Dr Penny Spikins, from the Department of Archaeology at the University of York, discusses her research revealing the surprising extent to which individuals in our evolutionary past depended on each other and how traits such as compassion and patience have driven human evolution.  Rethinking what may have been important to our early ancestors might give us a better understanding of how to help young people navigate modern day pressures.

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the relationship between physical and mental health

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the relationship between physical and mental health

January 9, 2020

People with a severe mental illness often experience a range of other physical health problems and their life expectancy is around 20 years shorter than the general population. In this episode of The Story of Things, Professor Simon Gilbody, from the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York, discusses his research into closing the gap in health and life expectancy for people who use mental health services. 

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the psychology behind patient behaviour

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at the psychology behind patient behaviour

January 9, 2020

Why do some people with suspected cancer skip their urgent referral appointments? Dr Peter Knapp, from the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York, explains his research (supported by York Cancer Research) into patient behaviour and why people juggling difficult lives are more likely to miss an appointment to investigate symptoms that may be a sign of cancer.

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at blood cancer

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at blood cancer

January 9, 2020

Blood cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and the disease can affect people of any age. Professor Ian Hitchcock is researching how this very complicated group of cancers develop in the hope of discovering new treatments for the disease. Discover Ian’s motivations for becoming a cancer researcher and his thoughts on what future treatments might look like.

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at eye disease and the anatomy of the brain

Series Six: Looking Beyond Horizons at eye disease and the anatomy of the brain

January 9, 2020

Did you know that if you took your domestic cat to the optician they would be registered as blind? Compared to our feline friends, human beings have an extremely sophisticated sense of sight, but what happens to our brains when we lose it because of eye disease? Check you have no metal in your pockets and join Professor Tony Morland, from the Department of Psychology at the University of York, for a podcast tour of York Neuroimaging Centre.

Special Edition: Safety of Artificial Intelligence

Special Edition: Safety of Artificial Intelligence

December 13, 2019

How can we ensure that machines and systems taking decisions and actions previously taken by a human do so safely and as expected? How can we assure the safety of a machine that learns while it is in operation and who is responsible when a machine makes a decision that causes harm? Dr Ana MacIntosh and Professor John McDermid, from the Assuring Autonomy International Programme at the University of York, explore these questions and more in a special edition of The Story of Things.

 

Series Five: World of Wonder - the wonder of marine life

Series Five: World of Wonder - the wonder of marine life

June 3, 2019

We shouldn't underestimate the diversity of British seas, says Dr Bryce Stewart from the University of York's Department of Environment and Geography. From seals to basking sharks, British seas provide a fascinating insight into our oceans. Dr Stewart discusses marine life and risks of over-fishing, as well as how our ecosystems are transforming in a rapidly changing environment.